The Memory Palace

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Episode 120:
The Prairie Chicken in Wisconsin: Highlights of a Study of Counts, Behavior, Turnover, Movement, and Habitat

Published
Jan 12, 2018

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Music, Footnotes & Ephemera

The Memory Palace is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX, a curated network of extraordinary, story-driven shows.

Music

Notes

  • Do yourself a favor and read Frances Hamerstrom’s autobiography, My Double Life: Memoirs of a Naturalist.
  • Do your kids a favor and Jeannine Atkins take on Frances in her book Girls Who Looked Under Rocks.
  • And then watch Frances teach David Letterman how to cook a snake.

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1 Comment | Leave a Comment

One Comment on The Prairie Chicken in Wisconsin: Highlights of a Study of Counts, Behavior, Turnover, Movement, and Habitat

  1. Jeff Bloomfield says:

    More than an amazing story. Your heart-felt, lyrical prose/poetry really made a strong connection for me to your subject. What an amazing life: To be blessed in early life with a strong sense of who she was, blessed with the intelligence to figure how to live it, and lucky enough to find the exact right partner-in-crime to act it out with.

    Googling “Fran prairie chicken” was easy enough to the Wikipedia article and more. Curious
    than her husband’s full name was mentioned only once in the podcast and hers, not once–an unintentional omission, I’m sure.

    I came across her granddaughter’s website about Fran Hamerstrom’s personally organized post World War II effort organizing friends and colleagues to send 3000 articles of shoes and clothing to people in need in 13 countries. The granddaughter’s book (1000 tracings) was inspired by finding a box full of letters from war torn Europe containing tracings of feet so proper sizes shoes could be sent to face the brutal winter following the war.

    Clear, Fran Hamerstrom was even larger and more compassionate in life than even this artful podcast was able to convey.

    Worth a look: http://tracings.litajudge.com/stories1.html

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